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Category: Liability

Third Party Injury Claims in Workplace Injuries

When people are injured on the job, it doesn’t always immediately occur to them at the time the variety of individuals that could be held liable. The one chief concern that typically occupies your mind is getting treatment.

Instantly, people begin to think of workers’ compensation as a recourse. However, there are times when not only the employer bears liability for an employee’s injury or illness. There are times when a third party bears some (or all) of the responsibility.  When circumstances dictate that a manufacturer of a product or piece of equipment (Defective Products/Products Liability) used in the workplace be held responsible for an employee’s injuries, the legal theory under which damages may be pursued is called “Third-Party Liability.”

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Dog Bite Statute of Limitations in Illinois

In every state there are laws governing the length of time a claimant has to file a personal injury case. The “Statute of Limitations,” as it is called, essentially puts a time limit on your personal injury law suit. In some cases, depending upon the kind of claim in question, time limits on filing a claim differ.

In the State of Illinois, where this statute applies to dog bite attacks, the time limit is the same as those for any other personal injury case. Statute 735 Illinois Compiled Statutes section 5/13-202 states:

"Actions for damages for an injury to the person…shall be commenced within two years next after the cause of action accrued”

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Duty of Care and Personal Injury

Negligence is a basis for many successful personal injury claims and when negligence is proven, what the defendant did or didn’t do to constitute it often hinges on what is called a “duty of reasonable care.”

What is a duty of reasonable care? That can be a tricky nut to crack. Often, definitions of negligence differ from circumstance to circumstance based on conditions, relationships of individuals involved. So it is often necessary to contact an experienced personal injury attorney when you have a question about liability or fault in an accident.

For instance, a man walks into a home that is being remodeled and clearly marked as a construction site to inquire about a contractor’s services or a job with the contracting company or any innocuous question about the residence. When he knocks on the door there is no answer. He finds no one in the foyer, yet he enters further and calls out to find anyone who might be around. In the process he knocks over a scaffold, injuring himself in the process. Is he likely to receive a personal injury claim as a result? The answer is likely not. The man entered a clearly marked construction site without authorization. He took no precaution in wearing a hard hat or reasonable care when in the space and as such, his own actions constituted negligence.

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Damages An Insurer Must Pay in Accident Cases

In car accident cases, insurers are responsible for covering a wide assortment of damages for which their client is liable. When a person is injured due to neglect, those damages can add up quickly. Among the list of damages insurers are often responsible for are: medical care and related treatment expenses; lost income resulting from the accident or time spent recuperating; any permanent physical disability or disfigurement; loss of social, consortium, missed school, training, vacation and special events; emotional damages (stress, depression, strains on relationships); and damage to property.

As you can see, many of these kinds of damages can mount to a significant award. But insurers are often compelled to limit those damages. Despite the requirement to cover the array of damages for which their client is responsible, insurers take great pains to pay as little as possible. That’s all the more reason it’s important to be represented by a practiced personal injury attorney who can negotiate on your behalf.

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Medical Malpractice and Early Discharge Complications

When a patient is discharged early from a hospital, it can often have devastating repercussions. Hospitals have, at times, been known to discharge patients before they are medically stable enough to go home to finish their recuperation. This occurs for many reasons from overcrowding to a shortfall in capacity to manage surgical volume. The fact is, however, when a patient is discharged and then shortly thereafter re-admitted, it may by definition be a case of medical malpractice if that readmission was due to complications resulting from the early discharge.

Of course, in order to prove medical malpractice the early discharge must fall below the medical standard of care. (Would a competent physician in the same circumstance have demonstrated the same action or inaction?) In addition, a malpractice claim must also demonstrate that the patient suffered harm as a result of the action or inaction (in this case the early discharge). Further, the claimant should consider these questions:

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